Juvenile oriental sweetlips (Plectorhinchus vittatus)

Sold out
  • Juvenile oriental sweetlips (Plectorhinchus vittatus)
  • Juvenile oriental sweetlips (Plectorhinchus vittatus)
  • Juvenile oriental sweetlips (Plectorhinchus vittatus)

Juvenile oriental sweetlips (Plectorhinchus vittatus)

Sold out

 

Overview

Juveniles of this species have an attractive brown-and-white mottled pattern, and their cute wriggling swimming style makes them nearly irresistible to the impulse shopper. Adults, which can approach around 30 inches in total length, have alternating white and black horizontal stripes on their flanks and yellow fins with black polka dots. They also have a patch of yellow coloration extending from the chin through the mouth and up to the dorsal fin.

Feeding

In addition to this species’ very large potential adult size, this is one of the major challenges in keeping P. vittatus. Captive specimens may refuse all fare offered or accept only live foods and refuse to wean onto prepared items, which can become challenging from a practical and cost standpoint. They’re also easily outcompeted at mealtimes by more boisterous tankmates.

Their diet in nature consists of motile invertebrates (crustaceans, mollusks, worms, etc.) and fishes, so items such as clams, shrimp, fish meat, mysids, and black worms would be appropriate offerings in the aquarium.

Housing

Did I mention this fish can get within spitting distance of 3 feet in length? (I know I did, but it bears repeating!) While most individuals aren’t apt to get that large, a specimen that reaches only two-thirds of that potential size is still quite a tankbuster. To give this species the room—and dilution of pollution—it demands, you would need a tank in the several hundreds of gallons.

Size:
Variant:
  • Gallery
  • Description

 

Overview

Juveniles of this species have an attractive brown-and-white mottled pattern, and their cute wriggling swimming style makes them nearly irresistible to the impulse shopper. Adults, which can approach around 30 inches in total length, have alternating white and black horizontal stripes on their flanks and yellow fins with black polka dots. They also have a patch of yellow coloration extending from the chin through the mouth and up to the dorsal fin.

Feeding

In addition to this species’ very large potential adult size, this is one of the major challenges in keeping P. vittatus. Captive specimens may refuse all fare offered or accept only live foods and refuse to wean onto prepared items, which can become challenging from a practical and cost standpoint. They’re also easily outcompeted at mealtimes by more boisterous tankmates.

Their diet in nature consists of motile invertebrates (crustaceans, mollusks, worms, etc.) and fishes, so items such as clams, shrimp, fish meat, mysids, and black worms would be appropriate offerings in the aquarium.

Housing

Did I mention this fish can get within spitting distance of 3 feet in length? (I know I did, but it bears repeating!) While most individuals aren’t apt to get that large, a specimen that reaches only two-thirds of that potential size is still quite a tankbuster. To give this species the room—and dilution of pollution—it demands, you would need a tank in the several hundreds of gallons.