Blue/Yellow eye Kole tang (Ctenochaetus binotatus),

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  • Blue/Yellow eye Kole  tang (Ctenochaetus binotatus),
  • Blue/Yellow eye Kole  tang (Ctenochaetus binotatus),
  • Blue/Yellow eye Kole  tang (Ctenochaetus binotatus),

Blue/Yellow eye Kole tang (Ctenochaetus binotatus),

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  Ctenochaetus strigosus is known by many names including the Striped Bristletooth and Blue Bristletooth. Both C. strigosus and the Spotted Bristletooth (C. striatus) are sometimes called Kole Blue Eye Tang, Blue Eye Tang, or Blue eye Surgeonfish.

The Blue Eyed Tang is also commonly known as the two-spot surgeonfish or the two-spot bristletooth. It is considered an algae eater, and the addition of live rocks is indispensable for it to thrive well. The Blue Eyed Tang is considered reef safe that makes it an ideal marine aquarium fish in a tank containing other corals and invertebrates. It mainly feeds on the algae present on the rock by literally scooping it off of the rock using its protrusible mouth with specialized bristle-like teeth.

The Blue Eyed Tang needs ample space and care is not that difficult, which makes it a very good choice for a beginner aquarists. It should not be kept in tank less than 30 gallons. The Blue Eyed Tang should have plenty of live rocks with nooks and crannies that make it easier to survive in the tank. This Blue Eyed Tang mostly spends its days feeding on algae growing on the substrate. It should never be combined with the member of its own species.

The Blue Eyed Tang is considered reef compatible, and it should leave coral polyps and most other reef invertebrates alone. The Blue Eyed Tang makes a wonderful addition to any saltwaterfish tank and captivates any onlookers. It can also feed on frozen mysis shrimp and blend of premium flake foods for its continued good heath.

Approximate Purchase Size: Small: 1-1/2" to 2-1/2"; Small/Medium: 2-1/2" to 3-1/4" Medium: 3-1/4" to 4-1/4"; Medium/Large: 4-1/4" to 5" Large: 5" to 6"

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  Ctenochaetus strigosus is known by many names including the Striped Bristletooth and Blue Bristletooth. Both C. strigosus and the Spotted Bristletooth (C. striatus) are sometimes called Kole Blue Eye Tang, Blue Eye Tang, or Blue eye Surgeonfish.

The Blue Eyed Tang is also commonly known as the two-spot surgeonfish or the two-spot bristletooth. It is considered an algae eater, and the addition of live rocks is indispensable for it to thrive well. The Blue Eyed Tang is considered reef safe that makes it an ideal marine aquarium fish in a tank containing other corals and invertebrates. It mainly feeds on the algae present on the rock by literally scooping it off of the rock using its protrusible mouth with specialized bristle-like teeth.

The Blue Eyed Tang needs ample space and care is not that difficult, which makes it a very good choice for a beginner aquarists. It should not be kept in tank less than 30 gallons. The Blue Eyed Tang should have plenty of live rocks with nooks and crannies that make it easier to survive in the tank. This Blue Eyed Tang mostly spends its days feeding on algae growing on the substrate. It should never be combined with the member of its own species.

The Blue Eyed Tang is considered reef compatible, and it should leave coral polyps and most other reef invertebrates alone. The Blue Eyed Tang makes a wonderful addition to any saltwaterfish tank and captivates any onlookers. It can also feed on frozen mysis shrimp and blend of premium flake foods for its continued good heath.

Approximate Purchase Size: Small: 1-1/2" to 2-1/2"; Small/Medium: 2-1/2" to 3-1/4" Medium: 3-1/4" to 4-1/4"; Medium/Large: 4-1/4" to 5" Large: 5" to 6"